National Anthem Faux Pax at Run United 2 2013

Happy 115th Independence Day, mga kababayan ko!  It’s great to live in a country where we can freely wave our flag and sing the National Anthem.

I ran the 10k race of Run United 2.  Before gun start at 5:30 a.m., we sang our National Anthem, the Lupang Hinirang. It was a nice touch.  It made me feel more nationalistic.

All of us 10k runners, packed in the race corral on the northbound lane, were singing with gusto. At the same time on the southbound lane, the 32k runners were speeding by.  As they were running, they heard the Lupang Hinirang.  They all looked confused.

Should they stop or continue to race?

Funny, some runners placed their right hand on their left chest while running.

Nobody stopped for the National Anthem, but can we blame them? After all, they were in the middle of a race.

In Sec. 38 of the Republic Act No. 8491 it says,

“When the National Anthem is played at a public gathering, whether by a band or by singing or both, or reproduced by any means, the attending public shall sing the anthem. The singing must be done with fervor.

As a sign of respect, all persons shall stand at attention and face the Philippine flag, if there is one displayed, and if there is none, they shall face the band or the conductor. At the first note, all persons shall execute a salute by placing their right palms over their left chests. Those in military, scouting, citizens military training and security guard uniforms shall give the salute prescribed by their regulations. The salute shall be completed upon the last note of the anthem.”

I heard that at the start of the 32k race, the anthem was sung and then again before the 21k race.  Was it really necessary to sing it before all the races?  I think once is enough, that is, only for the first race of the day.

What’s your take on this?

Other RU2 stories:
Run United 2 10km Race in Doodle Buddy
Guest Post: Truth and Consequence
How to Avoid a DNFS

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4 thoughts on “National Anthem Faux Pax at Run United 2 2013

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